Myron Dueck

Ask Them’ – Why listening to our students matters more than ever..

In this humorous, fast-paced and broadly relevant keynote, Myron will start with the unmistakable reality that we are all different in our passions, skills and learning styles. Considering this reality, and our theme,‘Student-Focused For the Past 30 Years’, we need to continue to make learning personal, meaningful and relevant, and essential to this goal is asking the student for input.  In an era of Facebook and Trip Advisor, where feedback from the user is considered essential information, how often do we ask  students for their opinion on grading, assessment, reporting or relationships? In ‘Ask Them’ Myron Dueck will argue that more than ever we need to be ‘student-focused’ and integral to this mission is that we ask students about their opinions and experiences as they relate to learning. By sharing the views of real students, and incorporating some of the tools used to gather evidence of learning, Myron will present the case that students have much to share concerning their understanding and it is time we listened very carefully.

Mixed Messages – The disconnect between what educators say and do, and how grading & assessment changes can help. 

 Schools have mission statements and an abundance of rules and policies. What are educators and students to do when the messages embedded in these established doctrines collide with the very practices used in the school? This keynote highlights how mixed messages abound everywhere in our society and that the extent to which our actions contradict our words ranges from the humorous to the disturbing.  Unfortunately it’s no different in schools.  If we truly are ‘Student-Focused For the Past 30 Years’ and if we intend to put learners first in the next 30 years, we need to send positive messages about learning in everything we do.  This keynote not only addressed the issue of confusing statements, but participants will also get a few suggestions and hands-on strategies to deal with the most obvious mixed messages surrounding standards-based grading issues related to learning, post-secondary, homework, lates and attendance.